Mason dating system

22 Mar

The familiar term Mason Jar came after its inventor, Mr. Mason, who, at age 26, was a tinsmith in New York City.

He perfected a machine that could cut threads into lids, which ushered in the ability of manufacturing a jar with a reusable, screw-on, lid.

However, I have never found any concrete evidence to back up this claim.

Lately, these jars have sold for more on on-line auctions such as e Bay.

These familiar jars with their glass lids and wire bales are still found in novelty stores today.

Some of the Boyd jars were made by the Greenfield Fruit Jar and Bottle Company in Greenfield, IN while others were made by the Illinois Glass Company/Illinois Pacific Glass Company.

At the end of the day the blower and his team would get paid for the amount of jars they produced as determined by the number of jars made with a given number on them. Later, when glass making went to machine the numbers represented the mold or machine the jar was made from (usually 4-8 molds per machine or one to several machines per factory.) That way the plant manager could check quality control, production, etc.

There is a rumor that jars with the number 13 were more valuable because superstitious people were afraid to can in them, broke them or threw them away.

Lightning jars represent an important advancement in the history of home canning and are still a part of American culture.

Some historians suggest that the term "white lightning" may have been inspired not only from the effect of ingesting homemade corn whiskey but by the name of the jars the whiskey was frequently stored in.